Hexagram #9

Hexagram #9 of the I Ching is called "Small Accumulating" or "The Taming Power of the Small".  Visually, this hexagram doesn't seem to be as tightly connected to the previous one as others have been with their previous one.  The lower trigram is reversed from yin to yang, but I can't see such reversal in... Continue Reading →

Hexagram #8

Hexagram #8 is "Grouping" or "Holding Together".  It is the reverse of the previous hexagram, with the upper and lower trigrams reversed.  Now water is above the earth or The Receptive, instead of being below it.  It follows in logical sequence from the previous hexagram, Legions or The Army, because a large group of people... Continue Reading →

Hexagram #7

Hexagram #7 is called "The Army" or "Legions".  Visually, it follows the previous hexagram by converting the upper trigram to its opposite, The Receptive, and leaving the lower trigram unchanged.  Symbolically, whenever there is an argument or conflict, crowds of people (legions) are likely to show up. The main idea behind this hexagram is one... Continue Reading →

Hexagram #6

This hexagram, called "Arguing" or "Conflict", is the reverse of the previous one in the sense that the upper and lower trigrams are reversed.  Instead of having the trigram of The Creative below the Water, now The Creative is above the Water.  This indicates a lack of stability.  This hexagram counsels us that now is... Continue Reading →

Hexagram #5

The fifth hexagram of the I Ching is called Attending, Waiting, or Nourishment.  It follows from the previous hexagram - Sprouting - because it deals with themes of nurturing new growth and continued development of this new growth. The overall idea behind this hexagram is that there is something immature that must be nourished if... Continue Reading →

Hexagram #4

This hexagram is called "enveloping" or "youthful folly" and it follows from the previous one by moving the two yang lines from the first and fifth places to the second and sixth places.  This implies that whatever was emerging with the previous hexagram ("sprouting") has moved into a new phase.  Indeed, this hexagram depicts something... Continue Reading →

Hexagram #3

This hexagram is called "sprouting" or "difficulty at the beginning".  The image is one of a young plant beginning to push its way through the earth, and it is the third hexagram because it is the logical result of the union of heaven and earth.  Rain and sunlight come from the heaven to the earth,... Continue Reading →

Hexagram #2

The second hexagram in the I Ching is the exact opposite of the first.  Instead of 6 strong, yang lines, we have 6 weak, yin lines.  This hexagram usually carries the name "the receptive", because that is the nature of yin.  Stephen Karcher's translation of the I Ching actually calls it "field" which I find... Continue Reading →

Hexagram #1

The first hexagram in the I Ching is commonly called "The Creative".  Stephen Karcher refers to it as "Force".  I don't feel particularly drawn to the latter, so I will also refer to it as "The Creative". I find it intriguing that they began the Oracle with this particular hexagram, all yang (strong) lines.  It... Continue Reading →

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